Three Decades of Sylvan Lake Water Quality Data

Alberta Environment and Parks archives historical water quality data for Sylvan Lake.

Click on this link for a pdf file of the composition of the lake water downloaded in October 2017.

Water Quality Data-Sylvan Lake- 2017-10

The N-P-K plant nutrient, chlorophyll, and Secchi disk data track the natural variability of Sylvan Lake.

As Sylvan Lake is a bathtub-like water body, some components like the conserved indicator ions sodium and chloride have become more concentrated over time as surface and groundwater, and fallout from the air, carry soluble substances into the lake, and evaporation removes water during the open water season

The effect of the watershed human population on lake water quality is demonstrated by the increasing concentrations of some ions that are introduced from diffuse contaminant sources such a winter road salting. As expected, the lab-measured specific conductance has increased slowly as the salinity of the lake has risen.

Sampling campaigns completed during the last two decades have been facilitated by Sylvan Lake Watershed Stewardship Society volunteers in partnership with the Alberta Lake Management Society field technicians. Partial funding in recent years was provided by the Sylvan Lake Management Committee, the RDRWA and Alberta Environment and Parks. The total cost of a May-to-October 5-day campaign is close to $10,000. Water quality monitoring is not free.

Human noise pollution is disrupting parks and wild places

Quiet-Sign-S-4619

This article by Rachel Buxton, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Colorado State University, is reprinted with permission from the website “The Conversation”. Click on this link for the original article:

https://theconversation.com/human-noise-pollution-is-disrupting-parks-and-wild-places-78074

As transportation networks expand and urban areas grow, noise from sources such as vehicle engines is spreading into remote places. Human-caused noise has consequences for wildlife, entire ecosystems and people. It reduces the ability to hear natural sounds, which can mean the difference between life and death for many animals, and degrade the calming effect that we feel when we spend time in wild places.

Protected areas in the United States, such as national parks and wildlife refuges, provide places for respite and recreation, and are essential for natural resource conservation. To understand how noise may be affecting these places, we need to measure all sounds and determine what fraction come from human activities.

In a recent study, our team used millions of hours of acoustic recordings and sophisticated models to measure human-caused noise in protected areas. We found that noise pollution doubled sound energy in many U.S. protected areas, and that noise was encroaching into the furthest reaches of remote areas.

Our approach can help protected area managers enhance recreation opportunities for visitors to enjoy natural sounds and protect sensitive species. These acoustic resources are important for our physical and emotional well-being, and are beautiful. Like outstanding scenery, pristine soundscapes where people can escape the clamor of everyday life deserve protection.

News from the Alberta Recreational Lakes Forum 2017

Alberta Environment and Parks organized this year’s forum at Lake Isle west of Edmonton.

Several forum documents and presentations are filed in this online SLWSS folder.

The SLWSS did not attend this year’s forum as the need for input from community stewardship groups has declined. We did provide this report on our 2016 activities and projects:

SLWSS REPORT FOR THE ALBERTA RECREATIONAL LAKES (ARL) FORUM 2017

State of the Watershed 2016

Our comprehensive report “The Sylvan Lake Watershed-Second Edition” documented changes in the key indicators that affect the state of the watershed. Data on Environmental, Social and Economic Cumulative Effects variables were compiled for time periods of one or more decades and presented a picture of a relatively stable environment.

Water Quality Monitoring 2016

Preliminary analytical data indicate that in a year with little spring runoff the nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient concentrations have been lower than the long-term average. The lake water clarity remained very high with Secchi disk depth measurements typically greater than 5 metres. Photo albums of the lake sampling expeditions were posted on our SLWSS News blog site.

Nature Alberta’s Living by Water Program

The Society has promoted the Nature Alberta Living by Water program for several years and enabled more than 80 property owners to benefit from Home Assessments. Response to L by W has declined and we awarded a SLWSS yard sign to just a single property owner in 2016.

Government Affairs in 2016

The Society presented a statement on the potential impact of the West Area structure plan at a public hearing of the Town of Sylvan Lake with regard to transport of silt from construction sites through Marina Bay into Sylvan Lake in Golf Course Creek runoff. We recorded several cases of increased turbidity in stormwater runoff.

Groundwater Research

We assisted a University of Calgary geophysics survey team led by Profs. Lauer and Bentley to collect groundwater aquifer data at the west end of Sylvan Lake in October.

Quiet Enjoyment Initiative

The QEI subcommittee chaired by Kent Lyle continued its efforts to have local municipal bylaws adopted to control the sources of noise on the lake. An education and boat launch site signage project was developed at the request of the SLMC. Subsequent support by the municipal members of the SLMC was mixed and disappointing to the hard-working sub-committee. The QEI message resonated with and received considerable major and local media interest in its efforts to promote respect for others. An expanded QEI subcommittee report is posted here.

Community Outreach

Our ceramic tile for the new lighthouse is mounted on the structure with inscription: “Sylvan Lake Watershed Stewardship Society: Protecting the lake’s natural assets and values through vigilance and science”.

 

 

 

Flipside Kids Learn About Water Quality

This Sylvan Lake News story was published in the April 20 edition:

Children involved in the drop-in programs at the Flipside Youth Centre were taught some things about that big body of water at the north end of town, on April 13.

President Graeme Strathdee and Director-at-Large Susan Samson of the Sylvan Lake Watershed Stewardship Society gave an interactive presentation on the science surrounding the waters of Sylvan Lake.

Both representatives provided various examples of what affects water quality in the lake, as well aswhat procedures are used to test the quality of that water, such as pH testing.

“They talked to kids on how they do testing for farm runoff, and what comes out of rainwater thatends up in the lake,” said Deshon Lennard an FCC Youth Services Coordinator with the Town ofSylvan Lake.

Lennard said that in their presentation, Strathdee and Samson explained all the factors that affectthe lake, from tourist activity to bacteria from garbage. Their presentation also had a hands-onaspect, with children carrying out experiments that tested tap water quality.

“The kids got to do a scaled down version of the larger activities, with one simulating the types ofwater in the lake with cups,” said Lennard. “Each cup represented geographic areas in the lake, andthey used food colouring to differentiate the distinct areas of the lake.”

Lennard said that last Thursday’s session was part of a larger educational segment of the youthcentre’s programming called Power-up Thursday, whereby children engage in educational activities,that “engage them in diverse areas of science and math.”

“The kids were very interested and curious,” said Lennard. “They learned something new, and tooksome pride in learning about the water in the lake, because they’re from here.”

Our Stewardship Science message was built around this slideshow of water quality sampling of Sylvan Lake and Golf Course Creek.

DSC_0123

Can you collect a composite sample of lake water like Breda is doing? Flipside kids can.

Thanks to Sam Macdonald, new SLN reporter just arrived from NS, for the reprinted story.

 

 

Sylvan Lake Shoreline Impairment Video Surveys

The Sylvan Lake shoreline has been surveyed twice using airborne video cameras to record the impairment of the riparian zone by property owners, once in 2002 for the Alberta Conservation Association and again in 2007 by Alberta SRD together with Fisheries and Oceans. These are valuable records of the cumulative effects of human impact on the natural values that otherwise would be provided by the shoreline environment to protect the lake.

This graphic summarizes the 2002 findings:

sylvan-lake-impaired-shoreline-2002-survey-v2

The shoreline sections occupied by the Town of Sylvan Lake and Summer Villages or equivalent county communities are typically Moderately or Highly impaired. The SLWSS has recruited property owners along those sections of shoreline to participate in the Living by Water program of Nature Alberta. Regrettably, less than 20% of shoreline occupants have volunteered to have property assessments completed.

These three helicopter survey files should playback on a computer or phone. If that doesn’t work, then download the files and play them locally:

Heli Clip #1. File size 96 MB:

From Jarvis Bay, NW along the north shore to Sunbreaker Cove boat launch ramp.

Heli Clip #2. File size 95 MB:

From Sunbreaker Cove counterclockwise to the Boy Scout camp.

Heli Clip #3. File size 87 MB:

From the Boy Scout camp, SE to the Town of Sylvan Lake beach and Jarvis Bay.